Sunday, December 13, 2009

Tao Te Ching Chapter 19-6 Reduce desire



Today's Tao

Diminish self and reduce desire. (Ch.19)


"Reduce your desire and learn contentment."

"C'mon!"

"Meditate calmly and diminish your own self"

"Bbbbb"

Even some Zen masters say so.

But there is no such thing called "self" from the beginning.

How can you reduce or diminish something that doesn't exist!

Don't worry about so-called self and desire.

If they seem to bother you, just leave them alone.

They are part of your hologram like the snow on the roof. They will melt eventually.

Self and desire are just part of a nice Christmas photo.


«Related Articles»
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-No profit, no thieves 19-3
-Taoist investment 19-4
-Essence = Uncarved block 19-5
-Reduce desire 19-6
-Don't learn 19-7
-Tao by Matsumoto / Tao Te Ching / Chapter 19


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4 comments:

cwFrederick said...

self is what we are born with. by diminishing our sense of self we come closer to the commonality inherent in us all.

Jess Mendez said...

Hi how are you?

I was looking through your blog, and I found it interesting, and inspiring to me, so I thought why not leave you a comment.

I too have a blog that I use out of Southern California here in San Diego.

Mostly it is a collection of artistic expression, and I have many friends with the same interests, maybe you can become my friend, and follow, and I can also follow you, if that is okay.

Well I hope to hear from you soon, and or read about you….LOL

Sincerely,
Jesse

Naoto Matsumoto said...

cwFredrick-san,

Thank you very much for your comment.

It inspired me to write the following blog entree about the floating world.

The concept of self hardly existed in Buddhist Japan until recently.

Soseki Natsume, a Japanese novelist in the transitional period from samurai to modernity, suffered from the idea of self and modern selfishness.


Naoto Matsumoto

Naoto Matsumoto said...

Mr Jesse Mendez san,

Thank you for the invitation.

See you later.

Naoto Matsumoto